Category Archives: politics

Misrepresentation

On holidays I sometimes go to car boot-sales – what in the U.S. they call rummage sales, where people carry their spare or unwanted belongings to a field, and unload them onto tarps or picnic tables. You get to see … Continue reading

Posted in democracy, history, politics, UK | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Maps and the twentieth century

There is no internationally agreed map of the world. This is one of the more memorable things I took away from a recent exhibition at the British Library. The exhibition, entitled “Maps and the Twentieth Century: Drawing the Line,” reviewed   … Continue reading

Posted in history, politics | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Evidence for zombies

Last Friday I came home from Edinburgh, head buzzing with ideas after a 2-day meeting on evidence in development and global health. ‘How is evidence defined?’ the speakers from universities and NGOs asked. ‘How is it generated and used?’ Or … Continue reading

Posted in development, health, medicine, politics | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Leave to Remain

Why I cried about Brexit. I cried about the referendum. Explaining why is hard. It’s not that I was committed to the EU as such. I admire some of the values associated with the project of European integration: cosmopolitanism and … Continue reading

Posted in politics, UK | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

Rebooting democracy

In the New Scientist, Niall Firth channels a frustration with the democratic process that many in Britain are feeling in the wake of the general election. The system’s broken. Nothing changes. All politicians are the same. Why vote? It’s a … Continue reading

Posted in politics, UK | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

A distorted lens

Before They Pass Away, a project of the Anglo-Dutch photographer Jimmy Nelson, provides a window on some of the indigenous peoples of the world. His photographs — reproduced in a coffee-table book and a lavish website — are beautiful. But … Continue reading

Posted in anthropology, Ethiopia, indigenous people, justice, photography, politics, Westernization | Leave a comment

The EPA: A victim of its own success?

William Ruckelshaus was the first director of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In a recent interview he reflected on what’s changed during the 43 years since the agency was established — and in particular since the passing of landmark … Continue reading

Posted in anthropology, climate, environmental science, health, politics, USA, water | Leave a comment